Congress Acts on Opioid Dependence (ugh)

I won’t weigh in on the upcoming election, for fear of being barraged with insulting tweets by one candidate or ‘offed’ by the other.  But the current opioid dependence crisis provides a great chance to learn whether you stand on the side of ‘limited government’ or the alternative.

The TREAT Act takes 5 minutes to read, that would have increased the cap on buprenorphine patients.  President Obama undermined the TREAT Act by announcing his own plans to raise the cap soon after the TREAT Act was presented in the Senate.  After 7 years without mentioning heroin or opioid addiction, it’s hard to believe Obama’s actions were a coincidence.   Only a master politician can ignore 200,000 deaths, and then claim to solve the problem single-handedly despite a do-nothing Congress!

As I wrote earlier, few doctors will make use of Obama’s lousy offer.  Today Congress approved a bipartisan bill that will reportedly signed ‘begrudgingly’  by President Obama– who complained that the Bill ‘doesn’t go far enough.’  I wonder how many pages HIS Bill would be.

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Leadership on Opioids

Anyone who proposes an easy solution to the overdose epidemic is either a simpleton or a politician.  But far too many people entrusted with the power and responsibility to set priorities decry the number of overdose deaths, then stigmatize and demonize every effort to save lives.   “Suboxone can be diverted.”   “Someone might drive impaired after methadone.”  “Needle exchange programs attract drug dealers.”    Meanwhile the number of deaths from overdose make clear that current solutions are not working.  Small community newspapers have story after story about the increasing number of deaths, but the silence in Washington is deafening.    I picture a cruise ship leaving  one after another drowning passenger in it’s wake, while the ship’s captain dines at the captain’s table, pausing between bites to tell dinner guests that all is well.

Statistics and numbers don’t tell a story unless put into context, so some simple comparisons help demonstrate the magnitude of the ‘opioid problem.’  My perception is skewed after sitting with so many people affected by addiction, but we seem to have a huge blind spot for one of the leading killers of young people.  Consider the issues our country’s leaders talk about and our news reporters write about.   I think we all know the things that get our President’s undies in a bundle… but did I miss the Presidential Summit on Opioid Dependence?  This would not be the first time that our leaders missed the elephant in the living room, of course— but it may be one of the first times a President has been given a pass after missing this big an elephant for this long.  I’m old enough to remember the media soundly criticizing Reagan for failing to create a sense of urgency over AIDS.  And so I wonder… When is Obama going to express urgency about opioids?  Where is the media criticism of his lack of urgency?   Today he told reporters he ‘will leave everything on the field during his last year in office,’ just before he took off for another Christmas in Hawaii.  Will that time on the field include some concern for people killed by overdose?

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Kratom, Recovery, Elections

I received a question about Kratom, and searched for a earlier post about that plant/substance.  That post came shortly after Obama’s inauguration, after someone wrote to compare his experience at that event to his experience taking opioids.  Funny how every ‘high’ has its own ‘morning after!’

That Post:

On a message board called ‘opiophile’, a person wrote about being a long-term opiate addict, then taking methadone for a couple of years, then going on Suboxone for a couple of years.  He eventually stopped Suboxone, and had a miserable period of withdrawal… which never, by his recollection, ever totally went away.  He works for the Democratic Party (not secret info– it was in his post) and eventually used opiate agonists again (hydrocodone and oxycodone)… during his time in DC for the Obama inauguration.  He described how wonderful he felt, experiencing the opiate sensations while at the same time ‘being part of history’.

He returned to normal, boring, miserable life… until discovering a source for ‘Kratom’.  Kratom is a plant imported from Thailand that has opiate and other effects;  like many other ‘exotics’ it has not yet been scheduled as illegal by the DEA.  My understanding is that it is hard to find in pure form, and is expensive… there is also the risk of ingesting something (maybe toxic) that was substituted for what you think you are using.

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Clean Enough

In regard to my last post

There are many directions that we could take as we review that message.  My overall impression, as I read the letter, was of a person struggling to accept the reality of his condition.  Over and over, the person repeated the same behavior, starting Suboxone, stopping, and thinking this time will be different.

One thing I’ve learned as a psychiatrist, more than anything, is that change is difficult, and rare.  The writer ends with the thought that maybe this time will REALLY be different.  I have no idea if it will be, and for his sake, I hope it is… but unfortunately, the odds are that history will repeat itself.

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An Addict’s Story

I received the following email last week.  I considered trimming it down, but the story is well-written and describes a history that is similar to that of many of my patients.  As usual, I will write a follow-up post in a week or so.

Dear Dr. J,

I have read many of your posts over the past few years. Like many, I started out disagreeing with your comments and insight, while blaming my inability to manage my addiction on the Suboxone treatment. My active addiction to opiate pain medications was brief, about 4 months of hydrocodone/oxycodone use in the end of 2007. In early, 2008), I reached out to my primary care physician who directed me to an inpatient stabilization followed by Suboxone maintenance/addiction therapy. When I entered treatment I maintained the belief that I was not an addict, and my doctor initially supported this attitude. He described my situation as physical dependence stemming from treatment of pain. I was a recent college graduate, I had a wonderful upbringing, a bright future…I believed that “people like me don’t become drug addicts.” So of course I wanted to minimize the seriousness of my illness. I convinced myself that this physical dependence “happened to me,” and I was doing what needed to be done to resolve the issue. So I saw my doctor monthly and went to weekly addiction therapy sessions. I did not use “street drugs,” or any other RX meds, so my UAs were always clear, and eventually I was seeing the doctor for a refill every few months.

At the same time, I was dealing with the onset of some anxiety and panic issues, which I also used to rationalize my initial abuse of the opiates. As college came to an end I began to get very anxious about the future and panic in certain situations. When I was prescribed the Vicodin and Percocet for a knee injury, it was like finding the key that turned off all these negative feelings/physical sensations. My beliefs regarding success and failure fueled my anxiety, and allowed me to rationalize abusing the opiates as self-medication. When I began taking the pain medications I had no understanding of addiction or opioid dependence, and I honestly thought “this is an RX medication, I am prescribed it for pain, it also helps with this anxiety issue, so taking a few extra is fine.” So, as I said, it was very easy to go along with this idea that I was somehow different than all the other addicts.(“terminal uniqueness,” one of my NA friends taught me that term, I have always loved it.)

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