Clearbrook President Gets it Wrong

A blurb in the buprenorphine newsfeed (see the bupe news link in the header of this page), has the headline ‘Suboxone challenged by Clearbrook President’.  I followed the link, and after reading the ‘article’ I wanted to comment to that president but the person’s name wasn’t included, let alone an email address or comment section.  So I’ll have to comment here instead.

The article was one of those PR notices that anyone can purchase for about 100 bucks, in this case from ‘PR Newswire’.  It’s a quick and easy way to get a headline into Google News, which pulls headlines for certain keywords like ‘Suboxone’ or ‘addiction’.

The Clearbrook president makes the comment that this 180-degree swing to ‘medication assisted treatment’ is a big mistake.  He says that in his 19 years in the industry he has seen ‘thousands’ of people ‘experience sobriety’.   I’ll cut and paste his conclusion:

There is no coming into treatment and getting cured from the disease of Addiction. There is no pill or remedy that will magically make one better. Those looking for a quick fix to addiction and the treatment modality being used by the vast majority of treatment providers today, will be disappointed with the direction our field is taking when this newest solution doesn’t live up to its claims.

A word to the President of Clearbrook:   I’ve worked in the industry too.  But unlike you, I wasn’t satisfied to see a fraction of the patients who present, desperate for help, ‘experience sobriety’– especially when I read the obituaries of many of those patients months or years later.

The president says that ‘no pill or remedy will magically make one better.’  Addiction, for some reason, has always been considered immune to advances in modern medicine.  We all know that addiction is a disease, just like other psychiatric conditions including depression, bipolar, and schizophrenia.  Why is it that even as medicine makes extraordinary advances in all areas of illness, medications for addiction are considered to be ‘magic’?

Those of us who treat patients with medications, particularly buprenorphine, realize that addiction doesn’t respond to ‘magic’.  But I see a lot more hocus pocus in abstinence-based residential treatment programs than in the medications approved by the FDA for treating addiction.  Residential programs charge tens of thousands of dollars for a variety of treatments–  experiential therapy, art therapy, psychodrama, music therapy, etc.– that have no evidence of efficacy for treating opioid dependence.  Abstinence-based treatments have managed to deflect criticism from their failed treatment models by blaming patients for ‘not wanting recovery enough’.

Buprenorphine finally allows the disease of addiction to be treated like other diseases– by doctors and other health professionals, based on sound scientific and pharmacological principles.   Abstinence-based treatment programs have tried to tarnish medication-assisted treatments, but people are finally recognizing the obvious– that traditional, step-based treatments rarely work.

And that’s just not good enough when dealing with a potentially fatal illness like opioid dependence.