Cannabinoid Hyperemesis: How Rare?

Marijuana might cause pain and vomiting in the people who value the drug the most. Doctors should learn more about cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome.

I recently read a CBS news story about CHS, or Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome, describing a 100% increase in cases in Colorado since the legalization of marijuana there.  A search for ‘THC’ and ‘CHS’ pulls stories from a range of sources including High Times, Wikipedia, Fusion.net, and Current Psychiatry.  A broader search reveals articles calling the disorder ‘fake news‘.

Most articles about CHS describe the condition as rare, but becoming less rare as the legalization movement takes root and grows.  The syndrome occurs in heavy, long-time users of marijuana who first notice reduced appetite, mild nausea, and sometimes weight loss.  Those symptoms, and the symptoms that follow, are relieved by smoking marijuana, leading those with the condition to become heavier users who come to see marijuana as beneficial to their health.

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Prince Missed Suboxone Lifeboat by 12 Hours

One of the links from this page connects to the ‘OD Report‘.  I set up the connection to highlight the epidemic of overdose deaths, not to sensationalize the issue.  But the Prince story is sensational and tragic at the same time. And the connection to buprenorphine only magnifies the tragic circumstances that are wrapped around the use of a potentially-life-saving medication.

I read some time ago about Prince’s chronic pain problems, primarily involving his hips and secondary to years of dancing in high-heeled shoes.  Shortly after his death, TMZ reported that Prince’s plane made an emergency stop in Moline Illinois on his way home from Atlanta.  They reported that he received Narcan at the airport after landing, and then was treated and released at the hospital before flying home to Minneapolis.  TMZ later reported that Prince was taking large amounts of prescription opioids that contributed to his death.

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Opioid Analgesia Without Addiction

I don’t have a lot of ‘pull’ with the addiction-related organizations out there.  I’m never been a ‘joiner’, and I tend to notice the problems caused by medical societies over the good things that they supposedly accomplish.    For example PROP, or ‘Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing’, have a specific mission.  Once a group has a mission, any considerations about individual patients go out the window.  PROP has propagated the message that opioids are NEVER beneficial for patients with chronic pain.  Legislators with no knowledge of clinical medicine hear that message, and respond by passing draconian laws that interfere with any considerations of individual patients.  I would guess that the people of PROP pat themselves on the back for encouraging laws that remove physician autonomy.  I’m sure they figure that they are smarter than all the family practice docs out there.  But in reality, they are only destroying the control of doctors over patient care, and handing that care over to politicians.  Way to go, PROP!!

But I digress…

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Buprenorphine Plus Hydrocodone

I often receive emails with requests for my opinion about various aspects of buprenorphine treatment.  A recent exchange, for what its worth:

Hi Dr. Junig,

I hope you are well.  I know you have written a lot about this, and I have read most of it.  But I still needed to ask your advice on my particular situation.  I will give you all the pertinent details and you can feel free to keep the answer succinct.   I know you do not have a lot of time on your hands. 

I have been successfully using Suboxone for over a year. My current dosage is three 8mg strips of Suboxone a day.  

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The Pain Clinic: Your Money’s Worth?

Originally Posted 7/18/2013

Like most of you, I’m not thrilled with modern healthcare.  I miss how things were twenty years ago, when I had a sense of ‘having a doctor’ who actually knew me, who had my best interests in mind.  I remember my father, a defense attorney in a small town in Wisconsin, telling me about the state’s ban on advertising by lawyers – a once-debated issue that is hard to visualize in the current era.  He believed the ban was a positive thing, helping keep the legal profession honest and avoiding the appearance of impropriety.   I remember comparing the situation to medicine and thinking ‘of course the ban is a good thing; just think of what society would think about DOCTORS, if they hung billboards for their services!

Those debates must appear bizarre to young people now, who can’t drive a mile without hearing or seeing ads urging people to sue over work grievances, accidental injuries, discrimination, medication side effects, malpractice… while hospitals and doctors compete for space for their own ads for pain clinics, wellness centers, hip and knee replacements, or robotic surgery.

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