Opioid Induced Hyperalgesia Prevented by Buprenorphine?

“Buprenorphine is a kappa receptor antagonist. For these reasons, buprenorphine might be unique in its ability to treat chronic pain and possibly OIH.”

The opioid crisis has been fueled by the use of opioids to treat chronic pain.  Practice patterns have changed, but doctors are still criticized for their roles in the overuse of opioids.  I’ve sat through community ‘heroin forums’ (sometimes on stage) as sheriffs, politicians, and ‘recovered addicts’ firmly pointed fingers at health professionals.  I, meanwhile, kept my finger under the table, but had the thought that some of the people pointing would be the first to complain if they were forced to stop pain medication prematurely for their own good or ‘for the good of the community.’

Doctors can’t see into the future.  I suspect most cases of opioid overuse began with well-intended efforts to provide temporary pain relief.   But then for a variety of reasons things didn’t go as planned.  Maybe the planned knee or back surgery never took place because of patient indecision or insurance problems.  Maybe the lumbar strain didn’t heal after 6-8 weeks the way it was supposed to.  In any case, doctors who work with pain patients know what happens next.  Before the next appointment, the doctor plans to tell the patient that the time has come to stop opioids.  But after that suggestion, the patient replies that the pain is even worse now than when the pain meds were started.  “Actually (says the patient) I was going to ask you to increase the pain medication!”

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Cannabinoid Hyperemesis: How Rare?

Marijuana might cause pain and vomiting in the people who value the drug the most. Doctors should learn more about cannabinoid hyperemesis syndrome.

I recently read a CBS news story about CHS, or Cannabinoid Hyperemesis Syndrome, describing a 100% increase in cases in Colorado since the legalization of marijuana there.  A search for ‘THC’ and ‘CHS’ pulls stories from a range of sources including High Times, Wikipedia, Fusion.net, and Current Psychiatry.  A broader search reveals articles calling the disorder ‘fake news‘.

Most articles about CHS describe the condition as rare, but becoming less rare as the legalization movement takes root and grows.  The syndrome occurs in heavy, long-time users of marijuana who first notice reduced appetite, mild nausea, and sometimes weight loss.  Those symptoms, and the symptoms that follow, are relieved by smoking marijuana, leading those with the condition to become heavier users who come to see marijuana as beneficial to their health.

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Post-op Pain on Suboxone

Many patients on Suboxone or buprenorphine eventually require pain treatment, just like people who aren’t on buprenorphine products.  I’ve written about post-op pain control several times, but I continue to get emails from patients who haven’t seen my comments and who view an upcoming surgery with the same fear experienced by patients before the early 1900’s, when the OR was correctly seen as a horror-chamber.

These patients are often torn between following the treatment plan vs. doing what they have learned may work better.  In all cases, I tell patients that they cannot act in ways counter to what their physician prescribes.  But I often support their intent to ask their doctors to clarify or modify their treatment plans.

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Opioid Analgesia Without Addiction

I don’t have a lot of ‘pull’ with the addiction-related organizations out there.  I’m never been a ‘joiner’, and I tend to notice the problems caused by medical societies over the good things that they supposedly accomplish.    For example PROP, or ‘Physicians for Responsible Opioid Prescribing’, have a specific mission.  Once a group has a mission, any considerations about individual patients go out the window.  PROP has propagated the message that opioids are NEVER beneficial for patients with chronic pain.  Legislators with no knowledge of clinical medicine hear that message, and respond by passing draconian laws that interfere with any considerations of individual patients.  I would guess that the people of PROP pat themselves on the back for encouraging laws that remove physician autonomy.  I’m sure they figure that they are smarter than all the family practice docs out there.  But in reality, they are only destroying the control of doctors over patient care, and handing that care over to politicians.  Way to go, PROP!!

But I digress…

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Broken Bones on Suboxone; Need Pain Relief

Originally Posted 1/11/2014

I received the following email from a Suboxone patient (from another practice) after he experienced a painful injury.  He shared what happened at the hospital when he was trying to get relief from pain, while taking Suboxone (the active component is buprenorphine).

Hey there.  Just to let you know, i was on 24 mg of Suboxone when I jumped off a fence and crushed bones in both feet.  The injury was among the most painful things I have gone through in my life.  At the hospital they did not understand Suboxone even though I tried to explain to them how it worked.  They couldn’t get a painkiller to break through and I was nearly passing out from the pain.  They finally used Ketamine and it worked immediately.  However, they only used it 3 times and its effect don’t last more than about 20 minutes in my case.  Then they switched to IV Fentanyl….I’m not sure of the dose but I know it was high and after a few injections they hooked me up to a drip bag.  Just wanted to share this info in case anyone finds themselves in a situation like mine where I was ready to strangle a doctor because they tried all of the regular oxycodone, hydromorphone, morphine, etc. all the while I was almost (or maybe even) in a state of shock from the pain.

Hope this can help someone out in the future.

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